Kinsmen Park memories

No rides in Kinsmen Park this year. After closing the rides at the end of last season, the City began construction of new attractions that are scheduled to be open in 2014.

City of Saskatoon offers free rides (normally $1 per ride) on the last day of operation of the Kinsmen Park train and carousel, Labour Day, Monday, September 3, 2012. The City is decommissioning the miniature train and carousel for a 25-year multimillion-dollar plan to renovate the 46-acre Kinsmen Park. A ferris wheel was removed several years ago. On March 5, 2013, the City of Saskatoon announced that the 38-year-old train had been sold to Country Fun Farms, a 70-acre theme farm 10 km east of Prince Albert. (Darrell Noakes)

City of Saskatoon offers free rides on the last day of operation of the Kinsmen Park train and carousel, Labour Day, Monday, September 3, 2012.

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Summer nights at the beach

Burger Buoy, Manitou Beach, Victoria Day Weekend Saturday Night (Darrell Noakes)

Burger Buoy, Manitou Beach, Victoria Day Weekend Saturday Night (Darrell Noakes)

When I was growing up, we never had summer nights at the beach. There were plenty of beaches — Christina Lake, Champion Lakes, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lakes, probably many I never heard of — that people went to. A lot of my friends’ families had cabins at “the beach”, and they went there regularly. We didn’t do that.

Instead, we went camping, often roughing it for weeks at a time, staying at old forestry camps up in the back country of the West Kootenay region, mainly up around Whatshan, Mosquito (aptly named!) and Caribou lakes. I really enjoyed those trips and still cherish the memories of them (even Mosquito Lake), but I never experienced the phenomenon known as “going to the cabin” or “going to the beach”. Continue reading

Banking on words

Crawford's Used Books, Perdue, Saskatchewan.I was just thumbing through an obviously well loved, but also well cared for, copy of the Money-Saving Cookbook by Ida Bailey Allen, published by Nelson Doubleday Inc., 1942. Three years into the Second World War, on the heels of the decade-long Great Depression, folks on the home front no doubt would have appreciated whatever advice they could find on how to stretch scarce resources to make ends meet.

I really enjoyed that warm September day in 2011 when we found that cookbook. I had received an assignment from Westworld Saskatchewan Magazine to photograph Ralph Crawford for a back-of-book piece about his bookstore, Crawford’s Used Books, in Perdue, 60 km west of Saskatoon. Continue reading